The Last Plane Home

S1 Eps 4 - Is Three Still a Crowd - How to Travel in Groups

January 11, 2021 Guy Guyton / Matt Tapia Season 1 Episode 4
The Last Plane Home
S1 Eps 4 - Is Three Still a Crowd - How to Travel in Groups
Transcript
Guy Guyton:

Hey there, welcome to the last plane home podcast where we talk about where to travel next and how to get there. Today we have a great show for you where I sit down with friend of the program and travel partner in crime. Matt tapiwa. talk to you about what you need to know when traveling in groups. tabea is a tech advisor and sales leader with a passion for domestic and international travel, already exploring 16 countries and 28 states. Today, he's gonna help share with us how to organize your group trips, how to create an inventory with multiple people and get his top tips for group dynamics during the trip, so Javea Hi, thanks so much for joining. But hey,

Matt Tapia:

thanks for having me. Man. This is a I'm excited.

Guy Guyton:

super happy to have you on the show. Finally, I just got back from Hawaii here.

Matt Tapia:

And was it the locals call it a bite, actually? And it's molana actually want to move on?

Guy Guyton:

Okay, okay, good.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, no, it was great man. Being able to actually get away in like a time when we couldn't really travel is it was a great little reset. And you mentioned where I've traveled to. And I'm pretty sad that I wasn't able to add any new countries this year. So just even getting away for a few days was was refreshing.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I know, we'll talk about a little bit more in the show, too. But we've had a pretty good running streak of new large international trips each of the years and by telling us a little bit hard, but we will talk about what to plan for and how we'll go through that coming up. Let's start out by maybe just going over what are some of the popular options, how to travel and you know, what are the benefits of each, there's different,

Matt Tapia:

I guess, events and scenarios in which they're gonna affect how you're going to travel. And I guess the group size, right. So like, when I think of like traveling alone or solo, it's most likely, like the first place where my head goes, is it's like a college gap year, or something like that, where you're going to go, you know, do your euro trip and get away and experience new people do the whole hospital jump in. But in they just kind of like immerse yourself in travel for the first time. Like, that's a big thing that jumps out to me for solo travel. And the thing with that, that kind of comes right to mind is, you know, you're you're looking out for number one the whole time, right, like, so, you're responsible for all of it. If anything happens, like it's kinda on you, but it's also at your own, at your own, at your own discretion, right, like, so you're, you're accountable the entire time. And so that includes safety, like, especially if you're traveling, you know, man or woman, like you could get things stolen from you, or you could be in a serious scenario. And it's, it's up to you to get it out. So that's kind of how I think of like solo travel. But there's traveling as a couple this traveling, you know, whether it's, you know, as an actual couple or traveling, you know, just to people. Also great, but what's been my favorite really is traveling as well, right? Like, maybe you all want to go to a club versus going to, you know, something else. But that's been really great. And you're not having to worry about, you know, just one other person or seven other people, like, you know, look for a large group, like a bachelor party or Bachelorette like you have a lot to people to manage. So having just three people has been my favorite experience, especially when it comes to international. Yeah,

Guy Guyton:

I think there's a lot of pressure in in couples. It's the balance of you want to do the right thing for your partner, whoever it is, right? Like a relationship or just two people. So you're trying to like it's a tug of war, right? And I do agree, right? The three kind of eases the burden of having to always plan like what two people you have to be active in every plan. For the most part. Yep. With three you can kind of I look at it's like being in a car and you rotate seats, someone's driving someone shooting shotgun and is awake, someone's in the back sleep sleeping, and you kind of switch roles? Well,

Matt Tapia:

I mean, if I'm in the back, I'm playing Nintendo Switch and not listening to anything you guys are saying. Exactly. Exactly. Photography this whole time. We're driving to zoning it out while I'm deep in Animal Crossing.

Guy Guyton:

I mean, each of those each of those are definitely fun. I agree. I like I like the the throttle. I think we we have thrived in it and a few different scenarios. We have one kind of the main one and you know the trip Dyson with Derek too, right? Just being able to adapt. personalities play a lot into that too, though, you know, kind of being flexible, and we'll talk about that a bit more as well. But I do enjoy mixing it up. I've gotten a lot of benefit from solo travel. When I do that, where I have to focus on me and I have to ask myself, the question is, what do I want to do? I find like, that's fair. rewarding. And so me a good mix is you know, mixing in some solo travel first, maybe flying out meeting you there, wherever the spot is, and then kind of getting rejuvenated by the time you guys because solo travel can be tiring travel is tiring when you get more energy. I'm here, mate. It's kind of kind of a nice boost.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, absolutely. And to kind of caveat to what you said, like when you travel with as a throttle, as you so eloquently put it, I feel like you get a good mix of personalities. And so when there are two people who maybe override something in like, it's not something that you thought you want to do. Sometimes you're pleasantly surprised, right? Like you got brought along on that road to something that you weren't gonna try. And you learn about yourself, you actually find out that like I actually really into museums and never would have known otherwise. Right? Because it would have been something that you had done on your own or if you hadn't gone like the significant other.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, entirely agree, I think some of the best experience I've had is because someone else did the research, and they were passionate about it. And just the sharing of that passion kind of transferred over the energy and Ooh, you know, I could definitely try this. And they'll do anything for an hour type thing, right? And you if you know, the research in the planning and organizing of these trips, it's pretty hard to but if you can balance that out, it just helps you stay refresh, you know, constantly throughout the throughout the trip.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, you would have never tried underwater basket weaving in Spain. I hadn't organized it. So

Guy Guyton:

I was thinking more sushi. But yeah. So I mean, we talked about planning a little bit, but can you help us understand like staying organized, right, between budgets and flights, schedules, different travel goals? Like how do you what are your tips on staying organized? When you're planning some of these trips and introducing more and more people? what's what's kind of changed about like, since the last time traveling, and

Matt Tapia:

I'm convinced, like, once we're out of this environment that we're in, like, it's, I feel like it's gonna be like the roaring 20s again, right? Like Aaron's gonna be like traveling and like, trying to bid to actually like, go and explore and do things. But the benefit of, I guess, you know, what's happened with technology during this time is that, like, it's so easy to connect with people now via zoom and all these other things. So whenever we were planning something before, we would hop on a, you know, a call where we would three way calls like that, but now you can just do a zoom meeting, or WebEx or whatever, and discuss that plan, organize, but I think having that initial conversation, whether it is over the phone or meeting together, or whatever, is a priority, because it allows you to connect on the things that you want to do, and most importantly, how you're gonna get there and do those things. Right? So it's having the conversation about finances, right? Like, how much do you want to spend, like someone might have a travel? They might have a travel since like, they want to go and stay at the Ritz Carlton and, you know, fly first class and someone might want to fly on Spirit Airlines there. And, you know, say, I guess we're not a motel six in like Europe, like a hostel? Six, I don't know. But, you know, so that that piece is important to connect early and actually plan out the not fun stuff, which are the airlines and the hotels and hostels, or Airbnb s, all of all that side. And you can have some flexibility in it, right? Like, if you're like, well, we might want to go to Germany for a week, or we might want to go to Austria, you know, but at least kind of have a plan to discuss early. And one thing to consider too. Part of that planning is, know where you're going, and what seasons are going to allow you to do the things that you want to do. Right. So if you know you want to go to England and you want to watch a soccer game, make sure that it's during that season that they're going to be playing right. Same thing with weather, like you need to make sure that you're not going during monsoon season teilen, which we almost did, and I'm really happy we did. So like you know, really make sure that you plan ahead and get those things nailed down early. So that way, it doesn't throw a wrench in your plans and you don't have you know, the amazing time that you planned.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, man, I remember the first trip to Europe that we did. I think we were on a three hour call. Just planning, looking at routes and flights and times and it was fine. First of all, yeah, it was fun and brutal at the same time. But the benefit was, the trip was so smooth. I mean, I think the hardest part of the trip was when we met up in Munich, and that airport was insane. Like Where are you?

Matt Tapia:

No, I'm at corridor 27 you're like

Unknown:

27

Matt Tapia:

Isn't that airport? I

Unknown:

swear.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, that's that's, you know, it is a little bit of a bear initially. But it is good to, you know, get those things nailed down early. And it depends, like, if you have someone like me who like I'm overly detailed to a fall. And like, I think I created like a pretty extensive Excel but the same time we just laid. Yeah, I just I mean, I love Excel. I'm an old man. But I, I laid it out and said, like, these are things that we could do. But we don't have to obviously do all them. And we did some but then left open areas for flexibility, which, you know, made an amazing trip.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I agree. I think the first things we did was nail down the date, range. Man, I think we did maybe three weeks on this particular trip. But we just booked the flights there and back. So we had, we had parameters. And now it's, here's this canvas that we can kind of paint with. And it's not metaphorical. It's not theoretical, it's no this is this is our bounds. Then set up some key hotel spots that were movable, set up some key intra, intra EU flights, and then left a lot of things open for interpretation. So I think we built in a plan that had in add some flexibility.

Matt Tapia:

A couple things a lot of people don't consider I mean, I think they probably do now maybe we just didn't, is make sure you have the right. Act like the right travel apps early before you go. So you have like WhatsApp or when you need to collect those numbers and you're trying to punch it in. And your friend like I don't know how to dial this area code, like my phone will alert me but what's that? Well, right. And the biggest piece is I remember, we got on the wrong chain the wrong way to the wrong side of Italy. And it took out quite a few hours of our Florence. escapade. And if we had to use Google Translate, I feel like that transition would have been a much smoother conversation.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I was so pumped for that train, it was a high speed train. So friggin pumped, just completely messed up. tirely dropped the ball. And I think that was a time when Google Translate had photo, like the the API for that was kind of new. And I think we were really trying to mess around with it just just in a panic and didn't really, you know, explore that. I think that's right. I mean, the thing I always do before I fly now, especially a different country is I go to Google Maps, and I download the map. And they have the train systems, all the metros all those because the worst thing is when you land and you get there, and you try to connect to the Wi Fi, and they try to charge you or something, and you're just trying to get to hotels and 12 hours, whatever it is, you just want to get there. So Google Maps is super clutch,

Matt Tapia:

make sure you buy the right things before you go to like, you're gonna get charged a lot more for an international plug versus if you just hop on Amazon or whatever and order one early and bring it in your bag. And same thing like under the first trip, way over packed, like the benefit of getting like an Airbnb, if you are gonna go that route versus hotels is make sure you have Airbnb that had a washer and dryer. And you don't need to pack as much, right, because you end up anyways wearing the same pair of shoes most time because you're doing a ton of walking, exploring. And you're gonna wear pretty much the same four or five outfits for the most part, unless you're going out for an event or, you know, had some reason for being out there. So I think the things that you choose to do beforehand end up saving you in the long run once you're already there.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I couldn't agree more when I went to China. And I've done some research about some of the key apps that you need or use. China's basically a paperless currency, country, everything is through the apps and they have a few of them. But you have to link your bank to it, which I downloaded the apps, I linked my credit cards to it, but I was able to tune back. What I didn't read is a lot of the they only accept Chinese banks. So I had linked to my account but didn't work. So I got to the point where I took it I'd take a cab to the hotel and the hotel had to pay for my cab and I had to figure out how to pay them later which is really nice of them right shout out to the JW Marriott in Beijing. But that like that PrEP is everything and you can just burn you know I would have I would have rather Uber for cheaper than taking a cab or something like that or just didn't have the ability to cuz I had no cash. So that PrEP is everything but I do think it brings a good point too, right? We we diversify between the Airbnb ELLs, the hostels, you want to talk about what that rotation looks like and what are some of the benefits of rotating instead of staying in same spot the whole time.

Matt Tapia:

example let's say you're going to like Budapest. You could choose to stay for two like you're going for five days because Jesus stayed two nights in a Airbnb in like the downtown Seeing where you know, like you're walkable to clubs and you want to go dancing and all that, for those two nights, and then you could choose for the next three nights to stay in a hotel, or, you know, for in an area that you know is going to be more museum centric or more local. So you're going to really be able to experience more of the cuisine and just have more of that feel while you're traveling. So it allows you to kind of be in the same spot, but experience more of different sides of that place, while staying in different things too, right? Like, if you're, you know, I mean, it doesn't really matter your age, but you could choose to stay in a hostel, like, you're going to probably meet a lot more people staying in a hostel initially than if you stayed at like an Airbnb or hotel because it naturally creates the social environment. And you're probably going to choose to do like, the crazy little bar crawls that they do and not remember any of that anyway. So that's kind of the mixing up of the different areas and staying in more than one place while you're in a safe area.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I think we purposely plan our trips always have a budget, I would say it's, it's very, it's reasonable, like we're, we're fine.

Unknown:

We

Guy Guyton:

try to spend a little bit more to maximize, you know, the time to money ratio. But that all being said it like a lot of it is travel hacking and points and other fun stuff. That means that we will still stay in hostels will still stay in some of like, the cheaper spots and a lot of it, I think, or exploring a new city. Well do that just to meet people who are like minded and traveling and try to get a sense of what are, what their temporaries are, and what is the vibe of the city. I think a lot of especially you mentioned earlier, like the gap year, folks from your gap hearing from uni. They thought they mean they're kind of laissez faire, they're like, maybe I'll stay in this country this day. And maybe I'll be in this one two days, I'll just take a bus for five bucks. So you know, getting energy off of them is awesome. Then I think we I mean, we've rented a house boat on the water, so we could grill that

Matt Tapia:

to this day is one of my favorite memories like sitting on top of the House boat with wine like chillin in in Prague. And like watching like people on like these like little boats paddling and like listening to jack John's like, that's still to this day, one of my favorite memories, but it's like, like, we wouldn't have known like, you could even do that if we hadn't seen like, I remember we were on Airbnb. And I was like, Guys, we we can we can stay in the house. But we could

Unknown:

totally stay in a house.

Matt Tapia:

It was awesome. Like, I think we did it for one night. And it was really, really cool. I'm definitely one of my favorite memories of that trip.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I mean, we were trying to do it in the Netherlands. And I would highly recommend it. I would highly recommend the houseboat in Amsterdam. But you got to book it like six months in advance those that queue is insane. Maybe not 2021 maybe now in 2021. So you can get that reservation you do it? And then the third thing is like you stay in hostels, you do this Airbnb stuff. I think we just stay in hotels because you want to clean shower, like just a balance helps. Helps keeps the energy high. And especially in groups, I think

Matt Tapia:

depends on your comfort level. Right? Like, like there is like you feel a little bit more refreshed when you stay in a hotel because you know like for like for the most part like they're freshly clean sheets like you don't need to wander out of the house while you're groggy to go get coffee because it's in your room or right downstairs. So there are some definitely benefits to kind of thrown in a hotel here and there if you are, you know, on a budget or trying to be frugal about your travels. Yeah, I

Guy Guyton:

do. I am much more on guard in hostels in certain situations and then it feels like I can unwind a little bit get a nice little continental free breakfast here. And there's benefits to like when you go to the hotels you don't have to do you can still find good value there. So we've we've done it we've planned we've organized our trip, we have this Excel sheet with 5000 rows. Thank you Tapia. What happens next like you know are waking up at 6am pulling out like MapQuest printouts and following like a our bow or cinerary or, I mean, how do you deal with this the group dynamics how everyone's feeling each day.

Matt Tapia:

I mean, obviously the the night before you have a big group sleep over where you watch scary movies and throw popcorn each other. Like that's ideal. But if you don't want to do that, then I mean, just the night before, like you hit the trip and all that like make sure you plan to be at the airport, like early especially if it's a newer airport. Like let's say you're already traveling and you know like you have a Ryanair flight at 730 in the morning to go to Luxembourg or something and you've never been to that airport. You should Definitely plan to be up early and arrive earlier than you think. Just in case like, and there's always little things that happen, like this person hasn't happened to me. But I've heard stories where you're about that you plan book stuff, you're about to travel to a country on your list, and you didn't remember to check to see if you needed a visa for that country. And now you're like, Alright, well, I paid for that. Like, there are some airports and some ways around that are like another it's like an expedited service where you can pay for to get that visa, either at the airport or near the airport, depending on the country. But little things like that, like you never know what's going to happen. So you should make sure that, you know, if you have a flight the next morning or a train to catch, what's your plan together to wake up at a certain time and get, like, that's very, very important. And just be aware of it. And if it's just you, you're like, honestly, I guess I'm hanging out, you know, in this country for another day or whatever. Like, that's, that's cool. But if you know that you need to be somewhere and you know, you're gonna lose money and it's a constraint on money, like, make sure that you plan to meet that deadline and have that plan.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, man, the Ryanair struggle is real. I remember getting to the airport. I can't remember which country but I, I luckily, I got there really early. I think I got there like 5am type situation for maybe 7am flight, but I had gone I went to security. And I was going through check in they're like, you can't you can't go through with this bag. It's too large. There was like a very specific sizing. So I had to go back out check my bag. I absolutely would have missed my flight if I had done my normal. Yep. My domestic travel routine. I get to the airport about 20 minutes before the flight type thing. Usually the last one on the flight. International if not recommend that. Because Yeah, especially if you're in a group where people are depending on you, too.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, exactly. And in Yeah, I'm pretty like reiners great in terms of like traveling on a budget in Europe. But yeah, if you don't know the sizing limits on the bag, like yeah, that's why it's so cheap. Like, it's like, oh, like you're an inch oversize, like that's 50 bucks. And like little things add up like that when you're having to do it on the whole each leg of the trip, right? So make sure you know these things ahead of time.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I've seen a lot of people fall victim, you don't really read the fine print there. I've seen people fall victim into paying two x what they could have. Because definitely right like, check bag extra fee each way. And it goes up significantly in the airport versus online. And having prepped that ahead.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, you walk on the plane, and they're like, oh, Sir, did you wanted to see? Yeah, that's an extra $150.

Unknown:

back.

Guy Guyton:

Now, the undercar go with the pads.

Matt Tapia:

I mean, if there's cuts involved, but I'm in for saving 100

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I mean, okay, so. So we plan we've organized, that's great. What are we? What are some tips for how to be a good travel buddy? What are some things that are no no's that will just destroy the soul of your travel group?

Matt Tapia:

I mean, it's kind of, I feel like it comes down to Golden Rule, like, like, treat everyone how you want to be treated, right? Like, just make sure that you're respectful of other like, it's not when you choose to travel with other people, it's not just your trip, right? Like you're there as a group so you need to be considerate of the fact that like, there's going to be clashing times of things so you need to be open to not always seeing everything like you can you can plan everything and I guarantee you're not gonna see everything because that's just how travel works. Right? Like if you really want to see it that bad like you just go back right? So I think it's really important to be considerate of everyone and like not everyone's gonna like the same food or you know, those things so just communication is really key. And how you be a bad travel buddy is you do pretty much all those things right? Plus some added benefits are added not benefits are added things that are going to possibly get you in trouble, right like so one of the number one of the really fun things that we did on our Europe trip was we are not grant made like a super long list of like things that you can do. And you get points and like maybe like fall asleep on someone on the bar and like for yourself and beer which some some of those things on that list were like, you automatically win but and like we're competitive people but like they're like pretty much if you do them, you got a good shot of going to jail, which no one did them. No one's in jail. But like I think that's how you'd be a bad travel buddy is if you're doing dumb stuff that can get you in jail or in trouble that takes time away from the group to bail you out. Or you get you know, blacked out drunk and lost and those things are like, you just need to be aware that you're not putting yourself the trip each other other people in jeopardy and that's how you, you know, kind of maintain a good vibe.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I would agree munication probably one of the stronger ones set up the expectation and you want to do something great is communicate it. But also be flexible and understand that and get it all in. There's just never enough time or as long as I'm not in jail. Probably a pretty good day. My legs are working. I'm not in jail. We're fine. You can recover from a lot of things to putting yourself in that situation just would be. There's just no room for that. I don't think you're spending you're spending your vacation and your good money on it. Just there's no room for that in group travel.

Matt Tapia:

You're not streaming from San Quentin.

Guy Guyton:

This is actually Alcatraz.

Matt Tapia:

Got it? Got it. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I can see the waves and that monitor behind me.

Guy Guyton:

He's just guarding me. He's making sure I stay here.

Matt Tapia:

Because he's not gonna be able to shoot anyone. No, but

Guy Guyton:

he'll look good trying.

Matt Tapia:

Sure. Yeah.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, they'll just you know, like 100 moral come right behind you knock one down. I can't hit water if it fell off a boat, but they try hard.

Matt Tapia:

That is probably one of the best like old man raises good water you fell up

Guy Guyton:

near the side of a barn door sunny. Alright, so let's recap. What would you say to group travel? Right? What would you say are your top five group tips for group travel? top five.

Matt Tapia:

I would say again, communication is key. Organization. Key. Have fun is probably the most important thing, right? Like, oh, yeah, it's not necessarily a business trip. I guess you could have some fun among your organization and communication. Fun, Fun. Fun. Another thing is respect to culture. Like there's some there's some things that you could look up that like, you know, I think in Brazil, there were some things that we were like, okay, like this is courteous to do. And I think actually, when I traveled with our we went to Budapest, and there were like, certain things that you could do and not do or say that we're like, that's kind of a no no, in their culture. So I think that's good. Because you know, you are the alien, in a sense, coming to that area, right? Like, you don't know the culture, you don't know the language half the time. So make sure you're respectful, I guess is that tip, right? Like, make sure you respect the culture. And ultimately, like, see as much as possible, right? Because like, you never know if you're going to be there again. You can tell yourself you will, but I think we all get travel blogger I like, like some people like going back to the same place every year. But some people are like, Alright, well, that was dope. I want to go now to the other. I don't know how many countries around the world, but I'm gonna guess. Let's see, I've been to 16 I'm gonna guess there's at least 20 countries in the world. So the other four I want to go to right. Yeah.

Guy Guyton:

I think that's awesome. I entirely agree. I travel mostly for the culture. I think the world is really small. I think we all learned I learned the most when I'm traveling and getting a sense for the culture and to seeing how other people live creates new ideas and everything I do from you know, content creation, professionally. in relationships, just understanding other people. I would say probably 90% of my travel is like travel adventures. And then the other 10% is like vacations I'm I would love I'm off for like the once a year trip to Cancun all inclusive spa where I'm doing absolutely nothing. For the most part, I'm traveling for the culture and the experiences. You know,

Matt Tapia:

I kind of want to take one back or maybe just slide in like a hidden number six bonus you can do because I'm a bonus like takeaway is what you just said and that's relationships because it does traveling is one or two different things, which is one it strengthens the people that you travel with, like you know, traveling with you and other people like I'm definitely closer with the people who I trust to travel especially since you can draw some people you learn pretty fast like this was mistake like the people that you can actively travel well with it just Makes you closer even when you're not traveling. Right? And then the other I guess side to that is, and you meet new people, and like those form, you know, new relationships like you and I, and I'm not sure if any of your viewers know us, but like you and I met, I guess, like five years ago or so at the JFK Airport in New York, I was coming from, you know, California, you were coming from New York. We met our little group, your group, and we were both going to Carnival in Brazil. And, you know, his conversation, we traded, I think snapchats and we kept talking, we met up in Brazil for a night like you and I danced, battled. And like, presumably, that could have been the last time

Guy Guyton:

was that dance battle, though?

Unknown:

I remember

Matt Tapia:

pieces of it. And there's a photo, which is amazing, where like, you can see us like, neither one of us to stop and like, it is the last dance. Yeah. And it's great. But But my point was, like, I could have saw you that time and not could have been at Riley, it would have been a great memory that we shared and just kind of like, like, Oh man, I crazy do that. I know that JFK Airport and like, spent, you know, a night in Brazil with my friends. And instead, it turned into, you know, you're one of my closest friends now. And we've traveled to more and more countries. And that would not have happened if I hadn't traveled. So the secret little key takeaway number six, numero sayce, as they say Spanish that is probably the most important and that's relationships, whether it's strengthen them or finding new ones.

Guy Guyton:

And then no doubt, I think, under the count, I think I made 1616 or so 16 of the 20 countries too. And I feel like at least 14 of them are with you. I mean, that trip, that trip was my first international trip going to Carnival and just happenstance from connecting layovers like just Wild Wild situations. And then yeah, I think my buddy, my my in London, will be on the show soon to was like, hey, those guys want to meet up for dinner. So you know, my bonus tip here is put yourself out there, right? Like, we could have easily been tired and been like now or we have a really strict schedule where we're trying to go see Christ Redeemer necklines, and now he's either down to go get dinner. Let's just do it. Let's figure it out. And I think we Oh my God, I think we bought on a budget that night. Everything was

Unknown:

so good. It was so good away.

Guy Guyton:

But yeah, I mean, instantly, just picking up on Hey, I think these are are some good folks in good vibes. And you know, when you guys called me up and said, Hey, do you want we're going to Europe? You know, do you want to come? Oh, yeah, I don't really know you guys, but like, Yeah, man, meet you there.

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, that was a that was definitely wild. Like it was we met you and had fun. And then it was kind of like, Hey, you want to do another trip? And I think that's, to your point. Like, you could have said like, I mean, I don't really know, these guys. Like, I haven't really seen them since that trip. I think it was like a year that had passed or so that next trip. Maybe. And but yeah, you you, you know, we're open and and put yourself out there and said like, Well, why not? and ended up again, strengthening the friendship and, and led to a great thing.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, absolutely. You know, recommendation, get yourself a travel group, put yourself out there. pays benefits, because as you travel, you grow stronger, and you build build these memories that you'll never can't forget, you know, they last forever. I mean, all right. So I mean, we could talk we could talk about when we talk, we talk shop all the time. So why don't we? Why don't I flip it at least see any questions for you? Or from you for me?

Matt Tapia:

Yeah, so like, I think in perspective of like, you know, obviously, traveling for fun is great. But for a lot of people who are forming businesses, especially in the downtime that they've had, like, I'm one of them, actually. I guess, you know, what's your insight for, I guess, differences between traveling for business, you know, how to do it the right way? versus traveling for leisure?

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, yeah, it's a good question. Look, I think a lot of the tips are, are the same, the execution is different. So planning is the first step. You should always know what your goal is. If it's a business trip, Hey, are you there to network, let's say you're going to a conference. Let's say you're going to an event. Let's say you're going to a new country, and you want to explore setting that setting the stage from communications right from the jump is is still super critical, in my opinion. I mean, I travel, you know, 2019, maybe 40 or so weeks of the year. You know, Got my getting my million plus points in miles earned and how I travel for business and work, you know, they're not too too, too dissimilar. It's just the objective. So I'm still planning, I'm still packing very similarly. But I need to, you know, if I'm packing a bag, I'm I know, I'm going for a purpose. And I'm most of my actions are lining up with that. So, if I'm traveling for work, I'm less apt to be willing to try things until x hours than the night because I am going to prioritize sleep and things like that. So I think that's one. And I think it's interesting too, for people who are starting businesses in 2021, I think the time is gonna be great. I mean, especially if you're a travel, if you don't do anything with travel influencing, or just growing a brand, there's gonna be so much opportunity. And I think a lot of companies, hotels and restaurants, so they'd love to have like travel influencers, share their message and, and share some of that marketing dollar and make it feel feel organic. And usually, the constraint is, they're just overcrowded, right? Like, the time you want to go is an influencer, go to these spots, it's like, the same time as everyone else wants to go, I think that's gonna be an issue wanting 21. So actually, now's a great time to start launching, and, and understanding, you know, set up some objectives. And the trips, and most important is like, now's the time to start stacking up points in miles to travel really cheap. Putting all that spend on the right credit card, I mean, you got most of your spend on that Southwest card, I know, you get that companion pass, right, in just you fly in your companion pass for free, you know, just setting a value like that now that you can use down the road, and most of these points don't expire. I mean, it's just the opportunities are there and the folks or folks are making, I think I earned like 400 or so 1000 points without traveling in the last six months. So definitely, opportunities are

Matt Tapia:

awesome. Yeah. And I guess, to kind of caveat to that, you know, as a new entrepreneur, you know, like the say, you are when you're trying to start a travel blog, you know, or a business blog or something like that. How do you? Like, what are the steps to even doing that? Right, like, because I think, you know, hopefully, we are on the cusp of being able to actually escape, you know, our house presidents that we've been in for the past nine months, depending on where you are in the country. But what are those steps look like? Like, you know, right now is the time to start that planning. And so you are in a good spot to do so. But you know, how you like what's step one to step three?

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, step one is definitely understanding your audience. And I think a lot of entrepreneurs, myself included, want to just jump into, I'm going to create content, I'm going to do these things. My goal is to get seven or so people or restaurants or businesses to work with me, none of that matters, until you understand who you're targeting, and who they are. And I literally tried to make characters, right, like when I personas or avatars, whatever you want to call them. And I'm trying to think about like, Who am I having a conversation with, and for the most part, you know, I struggle with that earlier, but now it's, I'm just having a conversation with my friends. Right now, my audience is very like minded friends who are trying to get the most out of the experiences and think that way of thinking of trying to constantly grow and learn and find new opportunities. So once I figured that out, you know, that's a lot easier to find your audience as one, and then to another one I struggle with is build community, and everything else doesn't matter how to build a community. So you don't need to have super fancy graphics and 4k cameras and all this other gear, you just need to think about, are you helping your neighbor, right? Someone came over to your house and asked for a cup of sugar? Like, would you give someone Yeah, of course you would. So how do you just continue to add and give to folks and it all pay itself back. And then third? It's kind of like to be the golden rule or be a good person, just constantly give out value, and ask for nothing back and facilitate discussion. If you do those three things. I'm sure you're gonna succeed in creating something awesome in 2020. I mean, the world is getting smaller. I just got back from the east coast, then, you know, we were quarantine for a while before we're getting results and things like that. And, you know, I still feel like I'm seeing my friends and we're still hanging out playing games or turtle play games after this. So the world is a lot smaller. And if you can just kind of build that community. I think, you know, success is gonna fall

Matt Tapia:

below that. Yes, it's great. And I couldn't agree more. So I appreciate you know, you have me on the channel and kind of helping with some of my questions and it's great man, like, you know, I'm looking forward to next big trip with you and, and there's gonna be plenty more to follow. So, um, I'm pretty sure I get to kind of cheat the system because I have a buddy who knows how to do all this and, you know, so I appreciate everything you're doing and can't wait for an extra

Guy Guyton:

18 man. I mean, we got to catch up 2020 so we had to do at least two international trips or some somehow we got a we got to fix the backlog. Yeah,

Matt Tapia:

I think we got to do to six month trips.

Guy Guyton:

Yeah, I think that's, I think everyone we all work now like this. This is happening, but

Matt Tapia:

I got to Transylvania. Like for at least four months. And then for sure. hobbiton I was thinking bronzes lava. Oh, yeah, I've already I've already been to Bratislava.

Guy Guyton:

We got through it even been there with me.

Matt Tapia:

I didn't experience the whole culture.

Guy Guyton:

You got to get the black the black lab, the black lava cake, like lava cake.

Matt Tapia:

It's far far. That is by far their specialty.

Guy Guyton:

Hey, man, this has been awesome. Happy. So glad you can join. You know, thank you. If the listeners want to reach out to you, how can they get ahold of you to have any more questions? Yeah,

Matt Tapia:

I mean, they can reach me on Instagram. It's don't ask why but it's crayfish 8887 on Instagram.

Guy Guyton:

Now, theonly thing I want to do is ask why but I'm not going to you instructed me not to. To therefore next one, the next spot another one? Yeah, the next episode.

Matt Tapia:

The next episode will be about obscure Instagram names and why not to do so.

Guy Guyton:

Alright, tap. Yeah. Thank you, man.

Matt Tapia:

Thank you.

Guy Guyton:

Okay, hey, travelers. That's our show for this week. We really appreciate tapiwa for providing some insights into his group travel experience. Feel free to reach out to him give him some love from the show. We'll link all this info in the show notes below. catch us next week when we discuss how to plan for travel in 2021 in our guide to international travel planning, and hey, if you have any questions about the episode, travel tips, travel hacks, reach out, you can tweet me your questions at travel with guy underscore or shoot me a DM on Instagram at travel with guy. If you haven't already, make sure you subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes. We're doing weekly. And if you enjoyed what you heard, please leave a rating a rating or review. It really helps. Looking for any of the tools we talked about in the show? Check out the show notes for this week's recap downloadables and links to everything we discussed. Until next time travelers peace